Shocking Tidbit: White People Are Uniquely Homophobic!

In response to the comments here and on other blogs, I have realized that I am all wrong. As it turns out, looking at a few exit polls is totally the right way to deal with figuring out the intersection of race and sexuality, which we should not try to understand in depth because this is really a simple matter. Therefore, I present you with the following:

According to the results of Initiative 1 in Arkansas, White people disproportionately supported a ban on adoptions of children by LGBT people. Exit polls show that 58% of White people supported the ban, in contrast to 54% of Black people. In my opinion, this is due to the scourge of homophobic White country music, conservative White churches, and a history of homophobia in White communities, despite their struggles to secure greater rights than other people. There are no other factors.

;)

Trackback URL for this post:

http://www.passtheroti.com/trackback/845

Comments

The Washington Post gives a

The Washington Post gives a figure of 70 percent of the Black community supported the ban: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/11/06/AR200811...

But regardless, why do you take the position that it's racist when it's pointed out that a majority of the black community, but suddenly it's 'ok' when you find a source that says a majority of the white community supported the ban? Isn't that also racist?

Lets look at these statistics as a signal that the black community and the gay community need to talk more and achieve greater understanding. Regardless of the details of the statistics it is disturbing that anyone would vote for a discriminatory proposition. Prop 8 has no impact on people's religious beliefs or expression, and no impact on teaching in schools. Check the facts. All of us should be outraged at discrimination whenever and wherever it appears.

You seem to be coming from a

You seem to be coming from a good place, so thank you. Though you don't seem to be the most careful reader in the world - the post is satire (note tag).

Jay, he didn’t say homophobia

Jay, he didn’t say homophobia among white people makes homophobia among black people ok. The post was pointing out that singling out black people when white people overhwhelmingly funded and voted for prop 8 makes you a prick.

It's more pointing out that racial reasoning or sexuality based reasoning based on exit polls and that kind of "demographic" data without any other backup is farcical and anyone who engages in it should take a good hard look at themselves and who they take their lessons from. I don't think all queer people who are pissed are pricks - just like I don't think that Black people who voted for the california ballot measure are pricks. I think they're people, and people need to talk to one another without the interference of outside forces like the media, the rightwing churches, etc.

But it might explain part of

But it might explain part of the discrepancy between the African-American anti-gay vote in Arkansas verses the African-American anti-gay vote in California.

Em, I understand you're trying to understand this, and that's really really good and goes far beyond what most people are doing, but I think the basis on which we're trying to understand these things - exit polls that categorize by race - is flawed. The point is that these arguments are playing into the hands of the people who WANT Black people and LGBT people and all those in between and everyone who believes in social justice to be at odds wtih each other. So while there is obviously homophobia in the Black community (as with other communities) and while there is obviously racism in the LGBT community (as with other communities), we need to get beyond letting the people who want to put us in little boxes define our narratives for us on these issues. There is simply is no WAY we should allow the media or anyone else to allow this to turn into a "Blacks vs. gays" issue the way it happened in the primary or in other circumstances.

That said, OF COURSE we need to combat and address and negotiate homophobia and racism and sexism and classism where we see them - but we should do so on our own terms, not theirs.

This morning, I came across

This morning, I came across an article that clearly explains why prop 8 failed within the black community. It is written by a black lesbian writer and political activist.

http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-oe-cannick8-2008nov0...

In my opinion, this is due to

In my opinion, this is due to the scourge of homophobic White country music,

Any lyrical examples? And do you ever listen to reggae? Ever heard the term "batty boy"?

My understanding is that gay couples in California have civil union rights and will continue to have those, correct? What is the distinction between a civil union and a marriage? Is one performed in a court of law and the other in a religious institution?

The Arkansas ballot

The Arkansas ballot initiative, while obviously aimed at same-sex couples, actually said "Unmarried Couples," not gay couples. And though I do not have statistics, I am under the impression that white folks tend to put a particularly high premium, misguided as it may be, on marriage, thus voting against allowing "unmarried" couples to adopt children. That's not to say that homophobia didn't have a huge role, because obviously it did. But it might explain part of the discrepancy between the African-American anti-gay vote in Arkansas verses the African-American anti-gay vote in California.

Jay, he didn't say homophobia

Jay, he didn't say homophobia among white people makes homophobia among black people ok. The post was pointing out that singling out black people when white people overhwhelmingly funded and voted for prop 8 makes you a prick.

It’s clear that you don’t

It’s clear that you don’t wish to have a considered discussion -
So, never mind.

Let me break something to you John. When you say stuff like this:

All my life I have worked for civil rights for African Americans. But I am not extended the same courtesy by African Americans - not just with Prop 8, but over and over again. Sen. Obama tops the list with his use of Donnie McClurkin to win friends and influence people - esp. black people. Then there’s his position paper that says that we need to consider all sides. Seems like in the 1950s and 1960s that was a segregationist argument. So we end up with “Marriage is between a man and a women, but I think Proposition 8 is discriminatory.” Huh?!?!?...

And do you hear a chorus of outrage from black political and religious leaders right now in response to the passage of Prop 8? Nope - just deafening silence. I cannot continue to support issues of importance to the African American community if the African American community cannot support the most basic of human rights for the GLBTI community. Call it “Divide and Conquer” call it whatever. The well has run dry.

Not only does it strike me as tendentious and disingenuous, but it's almost laughable in this context. I'm sure the work you do is meaningful in the context that you do it in, but "I like civil rights" is the activist equivalent of "I have Black friends" here. There are real issues here, and some of us, believe it or not, are queer AND racial minorities AND fall in other categories and most notably may have other priorities than trying to help a an agenda driven by a small empowered minority within the LGBT community. This has been raised for years, as have been issues of racism and classism in queer communities, just as issues of queerness and sexuality and feminism have been raised in communities of color. They are one and the same to some of us.

So if you want to learn about them, I suggest you actually make friends with some of us who are at the intersections of these issues, and then you and others who make these arguments based on a sense of racial entitlement (in the queer community) will undersatnd why those of us in the intersections of these two struggles sometimes find it SO frustrating ot talk to people on either side that we will resort to satire. Until then, please take the time to read some of the posts on this blog by me or others about what it is like to be a racial minority in the United States (here, specifically South Asian) and then you will understand why 'fix your own communities' or 'I can't believe that Black leaders haven't stood up' or 'this is what Martin Luther King was fighting for'--all of which I have heard today from White people on blogs on this so-called "issue"--strike some of us as grossly inadequate responses to what is a tremendously difficult issue for us to not just do activism on but to live through.

it is simple petulance - the people organizing this campaign picked a bad strategy and a narrow focus, and now they are suffering for it. Don't expect any sympathy form me, especially when the requests for it are framed in a language of entitlement and demands. What you experienced on Tuesday, I experience every single f@#king day. And I'm sure there are people even worse off than me, and I stand with them.

John, please make a

John, please make a generalization about the "white community" and then maybe we can start talking.

It's clear that you don't

It's clear that you don't wish to have a considered discussion -
So, never mind.

well played

well played

despite their struggles to

despite their struggles to secure greater rights than other people

Doc Anon, did you mean to say "despite their struggle to secure greater rights FOR other people? If not, then what does it mean that white people struggled to secure greater rights for themselves?

"I don’t think all queer

"I don’t think all queer people who are pissed are pricks - just like I don’t think that Black people who voted for the california ballot measure are pricks. I think they’re people, and people need to talk to one another without the interference of outside forces like the media, the rightwing churches, etc."

"the people organizing this campaign picked a bad strategy and a narrow focus, and now they are suffering for it."

These two statements pretty much highlight what's really wrong here for me. I've thought for a long time that the LGBT community doesn't do near enough outreach towards communities that are quite hostile towards them (and I can understand that, really, it an be disheartening work..but not doing so exacerbates existing racial tensions)...but that's where they obviously need to go.

Ok, I just read this article:

Ok, I just read this article: http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-oe-cannick8-2008nov0...

And I think some of what she's saying is unfair. It's not the responsibility of Prop8 to end all discrimination everywhere, and her point about there being larger issues that the African-American community has to deal with pits one inequality against another, and that tug-of-war game doesn't go anywhere. Saying one group's civil rights are more important or deeply impactful or otherwise meaningful heightens divisions that are painful and uneccessary (like, try telling a closeted Black 16 year old that he should give up the fight to be in a legally equal partnership or otherwise engage in identity-seeking because he should be out curbing HIV and solving homelessness. It's absurd and insensitive).

BUT, she has good points about the 'white eliteness' that has really defined the LGBT movement and their near exclusion of diversity even within their own group. Disabled queers, for instance, have been long since ignored. And I really bristle against the suggestion that ALL minorities should defend the rights of other minorities BECAUSE they are minorities. People who suggest this seem to have a very poor grasp on the divisions that can exist among and between minority groups, or assume that all minorities think alike. This kind of blanket generalization of minority communities has been propagated by white liberals for a really long time, and instead of getting indignant about it now, maybe they should try to understand those who they are maligning.

i also see the marriage

i also see the marriage movement as exclusive and i'm opposed to the institution itself. the queer poc group that I've been loosely a part of for 6-7 years has a strong critique of the focus on marriage, esp. considering its been fighting gentrification and police brutality in a corner of city where a lot of youth congregate, including many who are kicked out and homeless. its about the people the mainstream movement could really care less about.

You know I get so tired of

You know I get so tired of this racism thing. The poor me syndrome. I lived in a black community for a short span. They broke our door down. There were about twenty people outside. Some were asking what were were doing in their hood anyway. Another black guy pointing his finger at me saying he'd like to rape that bitch (me) Our white neighbors across the way called the police. The only thing that save us was our new born when a lady came bursting through into our apartment. I had retreated and got my baby to suckle and prayed it would all go away. The lady saw the baby and backed everyone off. Oh by the way read your history on white slavery in America, it might shock you how it's all been swept under the rug.

I get tired of racism too,

I get tired of racism too, jean.

Jean, the contributers to

Jean, the contributers to this blog most likely would not step foot in the 'hood that you bravely lived in. I grew up in such a hood and only those aloof and at a safe distance can naively claim that there is not a pattern amongst my fellow Af-Am brothers. The politically correct don't think there is a pattern because they don't live and breathe in it. For those of us that do, it is as clear and obvious as the noses on our faces.

Similarly, as a Muslim I see a patter in my pan Islamic culture as well. After watching CNN's coverage tonight of the most recent Bombay tragedy I am finally forced to admit to such a pattern. As a Muslim I am reflecting deeply on whether or not there is something inherent in my religion's ideology that gives rise to terrorism. Honestly I don't know the answer to that right now, but I do know that we Muslims are going to have to start asking ourselves that, very soon.

I think it is naive and dangerous in this day and age to put blinders on and pretend that we are not seeing the things that are happening right in front of our faces.

I think it is naive and

I think it is naive and dangerous in this day and age to put blinders on and pretend that we are not seeing the things that are happening right in front of our faces.

Brother, no one is suggesting you do that. All that is being suggested is that we keep racism, islamaphobia, xenophobia, and other things out of it. By addressing them too.

And a post titled Shocking

And a post titled Shocking Tidbit: White People Are Uniquely Homophobic! is not racist?

And a post titled Shocking

And a post titled Shocking Tidbit: White People Are Uniquely Homophobic! is not racist?

No.

Racism = actions and behaviors that promote the race-based hierarchy we have in the word.
Factually accurate but parodic post on the arguments that some LGBT people (not all) are making about Black people in general or in California = pithy response.

kbvxqxoa

kbvxqxoa [URL=http://fgrgaqnt.com]latypnbs[/URL] iihjrmsq http://jdfwoahz.com jzloxlef xgafwmzw

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.