sri lanka civil war

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Sri Lanka rules out outside probe

Article Date: 
31 May 2009

Sri Lanka has dismissed calls for an independent inquiry into claims of human rights abuses by the military, saying its own courts will investigate.

Foreign minister Rohita Bogollagama said the claims that heavy weaponry was used in civilian areas during the war with Tamil rebels were "fictional".

Article Source: 
BBC

S.Lanka seeks help in dismantling Tigers' network

Article Date: 
31 May 2009

But Bogollagama said the campaign to crush the rebels was a model for others to follow.

"Sri Lanka will, no doubt, enter the annals of history as a classic textbook example of a nation that successfully prevailed over the scourge of terrorism, whilst tenaciously upholding the cherished values of democracy and human rights that have been deeply engraved in the psyche of our people," he said.

Article Author: 
Philip Lim
Article Source: 
AFP

'I'm only 16. They gave me a rifle. It was heavy. They said we had to go forward. If we came back, they would shoot us'

Article Date: 
31 May 2009

The accounts of these boys and girls who surrendered to the Sri Lankan army were shocking. They say they were dragged screaming from their families and sent into action with only a few days of basic training. The older members of the LTTE warned them to keep firing and advancing, or they would be shot by their own side from behind.

Those who did try to escape said they were fired on by their own side. Children who were recaptured had their hair shaved off to mark them as deserters and boys were beaten.

Article Author: 
Gethin Chamberlain
Article Source: 
Guardian

The hidden massacre: Sri Lanka’s final offensive against Tamil Tigers

Article Date: 
29 May 2009

More than 20,000 Tamil civilians were killed in the final throes of the Sri Lankan civil war, most as a result of government shelling, an investigation by The Times has revealed.

The number of casualties is three times the official figure.

The Sri Lankan authorities have insisted that their forces stopped using heavy weapons on April 27 and observed the no-fire zone where 100,000 Tamil men, women and children were sheltering. They have blamed all civilian casualties on Tamil Tiger rebels concealed among the civilians.

Article Author: 
Catherine Philp
Article Source: 
The Times of London

Sri Lanka urged at U.N. to ensure aid reaches Tamils

Article Date: 
27 May 2009

The International Committee of the Red Cross, which has evacuated 14,000 sick and wounded people and their families from the Sri Lankan war zone since February, said it still did not have full access to its military-run camps for displaced people.

ICRC President Jakob Kellenberger cited huge needs for aid and medical care for those sheltering in facilities such Manik Farm, which holds about 210,000 people.

It is "still not clear" whether Sri Lanka will allow aid workers to reach people needy help, Kellenberger said. "We are in discussions with them," he told a news conference in Geneva.

Article Source: 
Reuters

End of a War: How Sri Lanka's terrorist Tamil Tigers brought about their own destruction

Article Date: 
19 May 2009

Rarely in the contemporary world has a domestic insurgency been as decisively crushed by military means as the Tamil Tiger rebels of Sri Lanka have been -- and arguably not in recent times has a reversal of fortunes been so dramatic. During a war that raged more than a quarter century, the Tigers, who claimed to represent a minority that makes up about a fifth of Sri Lanka's population, grew to control more than a third of the country and operated their own government, legal system, navy and air force.

Article Source: 
Washington Post

Sri Lanka army 'defeats rebels'

Article Date: 
16 May 2009

Speaking on a visit to Jordan, Mahinda Rajapakse said he would return home to a nation totally free from the "barbaric acts" of the rebel group.

However, senior officials told the BBC fighting rages on in a tiny area of the north-east where the Tigers' leadership is said to be cornered.

Article Source: 
BBC

Sri Lanka: Truth, bias and the BBC

Article Date: 
16 May 2009

Apart from all the above, there are some difficult problems reporting Sri Lanka.

Lots of the worst things that happen go on well away from the eyes of independent journalists.

In these circumstances, when we can't be sure for ourselves who has done what, all we can do is report what people say has happened.

In Sri Lanka that often means this: A group of people are killed, quite possibly civilians. The government and the Tigers accuse each other of the killings.

To complicate matters further, "shadowy paramilitary groups" may have been involved.

Article Author: 
Bernard Gabony
Article Source: 
BBC

Sri Lanka: Displaced Tamils seek missing family

Article Date: 
26 May 2009

Aid agencies have warned that a lack of sanitation and adequate medicine was allowing disease like hepatitis to spread.

Indeed, many of the inmates interviewed at Manik Farm said their children were suffering from diarrhea and other illnesses that stem from tainted water. One woman held up her baby who she said had diarrhea for three days. When she took him to the camp clinic the doctor said the child was fine and sent her away, she said.

Article Author: 
Ravi Nessman
Article Source: 
Associated Press

S.Lanka offers Tigers rehabilitation or trial

Article Date: 
26 May 2009

Many of the remaining 2,000 who have "self-confessed" are likely to face trial.

"They have taken guns, fought against the army. So they have to go through rehabilitation so that they can live as normal Sri Lankans," said military spokesman Brigadier Udaya Nanayakkara.

Article Author: 
Shihar Aneez
Article Source: 
Reuters
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