poverty

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/passtheroti/www/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

The Hindu: 14,200 adivasi families landless in Kerala

 How poor is the Indian economy for the poor?  That's not all the landless, that's not counting every person but every family, and that's not counting people who own some land and are still dirt poor.  And that's in the state that is used as a model for decent development by some economics departments. 

A small anecdote that speaks to the greater reality: the extremely poor are still here.

Drought Hits India

According to BBC, half of India's districts have been affected by a drought resulting from a nearly 30% reduction in monsoon rain this season.  This may result in a 10% decline in rice production, though the government says it will not need to import food.  Just some quick, preliminary notes below.

Appeal For Donations for Internally Displaced Persons in Pakistan

We're hoping to write something longer on Pakistan soon, but I thought I would pass on this appeal in the meantime.  I don't know enough about this situation and haven't researched many of the organisations below to understand how relief fits in with my politics here, so please act on and send on as and how you see fit.  You can see the original unexcerpted text at the website linked above.

Tamil Tigers Claim 150,000 Civilians on Brink of Starvation

Article Date: 
25 Apr 2009

From U.S. government funded news service:

Rebels in Sri Lanka claim some 150,000 people are on the brink of starvation in the territory held by the Tamil Tigers in the northeast. The Sri Lankan government says the rebels are to blame for the plight of the civilians in the remaining area controlled by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. The accusations come amid rising international concern over mass civilian suffering in the dwindling war zone.

Article Author: 
Steve Herman
Article Source: 
VOA News

Experts Urge US to Help Agriculture Development in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia

Article Date: 
26 Feb 2009

A group of specialists committed to foreign assistance is proposing a renewed U.S. commitment to agricultural development in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The recommendations were presented Tuesday by the Chicago Council of Global Affairs.

The 13-member panel making the recommendations is co-chaired by Catherine Bertini, a Syracuse University professor and former head of the United Nations World Food Program. She says an increased commitment to food production in Africa and South Asia would help bring 270 million people out of poverty by 2020.

Article Author: 
Barry Wood
Article Source: 
Voice of America
Syndicate content