post-war sri lanka

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Civilian, Military factions of Government of Sri Lanka Fall Out

Apparently the General and the President are squabbling.  The General:

"Your excellency?s government has yet to win the peace in spite of the fact that the army under my leadership won the war," he said.

"There is no clear policy to win the hearts and minds of the Tamil people, which will surely ruin the victory attained, paving the way for yet another uprising in the future."

UN supports Sri Lanka aid effort

Article Date: 
27 May 2009

The United Nations Human Rights Council has offered support to Sri Lanka's humanitarian efforts as it recovers from its war with Tamil Tiger rebels.

However, the emergency session resolution did not mention granting UN aid agencies full access to the 300,000 displaced people in army-run camps.

Article Source: 
BBC

Sri Lanka eases restrictions at biggest camp: U.N.

Article Date: 
27 May 2009

Sri Lanka's government has relaxed restrictions on motor vehicles in the country's largest refugee camp that had hampered aid distribution, though the needs of people there remain acute, the United Nations said on Wednesday.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recently visited the Manik Farm refugee camp, where some 220,000 people displaced by the fighting between Tamil Tiger rebels and government forces in northeastern Sri Lanka have been relocated.

Article Author: 
Louis Charbonneau
Article Source: 
Reuters

No Victory in Sri Lanka

Article Date: 
27 May 2009

Even after declaring victory in Sri Lanka’s 26-year civil war, the country’s leaders seem unable to distinguish between the enemy — the brutal but apparently vanquished Tamil Tiger separatists — and innocent bystanders. Despite appeals from Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations secretary general, and from others, the government has not given international aid organizations full access to government-run camps, where an estimated 280,000 civilians are said to be in desperate need of food, water and medical care.

Article Source: 
New York Times
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